Discography &
Performance History

By David Dann

1966–1967

 

1966


*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

The Trip; Hollywood, CA; January 5-16, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances


The band flew to California on New Year's Day 1966 to begin its first West Coast engagement. Billy Davenport likely first joined the band for these shows. The Byrds were the headliners.


Personnel as above.

The Trip; Hollywood, CA; January 17-30, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances


Wilson Pickett was the headliner for these shows.


Personnel as above.

Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; January 28, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance


A photo and caption in Stanford's student newspaper announced the Butterfield Band's appearance as part of the university's Chicago blues band series, noting that the group would "demonstrate its inimitable style in a Friday afternoon concert." Thanks to Bruno Ceriotti for this information.


Personnel as above.

KPIX studios, San Francisco, CA; January(?) 1966

Unknown title                                                   TV broadcast

Mark Naftalin recalled that the Butterfield Band made two TV appearances during its first trip to California. The first was a lip-synched tune on this unknown show on KPIX. He jokingly played the tune a half-step sharp, much to the dismay of Hans Conried who was also a guest on the program. Bloomfield, Mark remembered, used a piece of celery as a slide.

Personnel as above.

TV studio, Los Angeles, CA; January(?) 1966

Unknown title                                                  TV broadcast

This was the Butterfield Band’s second TV appearance. They performed a lip-synched tune on this show hosted by Sam Riddle – probably “Hollywood A-Go-Go.” The other featured band was Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels.

Personnel as above.

Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA; January 21, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                               Live performance

 

Personnel as above.
The Trip, Hollywood, CA; January 23, 1966

Unknown titles                                               Live performanc
e

 

*BOB DYLAN

Dylan, v, g, hca; Al Gorgoni, Michael Bloomfield(?), g; Al Kooper, org; Paul Griffin, p; Bill Lee, b; Bobby Gregg, d.

New York, NY; January 25, 1966

 

Leopard-skin Pill-box Hat                            “Blonde on Blonde,” Columbia C2S 841

Leopard-skin Pill-box Hat, alt. take

 

Even though the most recent Columbia personnel listings name Bloomfield as the second guitarist, this is almost certainly incorrect. Most discographers believe that Robbie Robertson is the the other guitarist along with Dylan on this title.  

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA; February 4-13, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                               Live performance

 

“EAST-WEST,” as “The Raga” is now known, becomes the featured set closer for many Butterfield performances by early 1966. Bloomfield occasionally astonishes audiences by eating fire during the playing of the tune which sometimes lasts as long as one hour.

 

Personnel as February 4.

Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA; February 1966

 

Cleo's Back

Just To Be With You                           “Strawberry Jam,” Winner 446

East-West #1                                     “East-West Live,” Winner 447

 

“Cleo’s Back” was an instrumental originally done by Junior Walker and the All Stars.

 

Personnel as February 4.

Unknown venue, Huntington Beach(?), CA; March 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Chet Helms and John Carpenter, co-producers along with Bill Graham of the Butterfield Band’s first appearance at the Fillmore, flew down to see the band in performance at this venue – a “little jazz club,” possibly a place called "O's" – and were distressed to find the group playing to a nearly empty room.

 

Personnel as February 4.

Pauley Ballroom, Berkeley, CA; Spring(?) 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Guitarist Barry Melton recalled that he and Country Joe McDonald first saw the Butterfield Band perform at this venue in "late 1965 or early 1966." The earliest date, however, is probably spring 1966. If it occurred later, it would almost certainly have been a Bill Graham show.

 

Personnel as February 4.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; March 25-27, 1966

 

Look Over Yonders Wall                      Live performances

Other unknown titles

 

Billy Davenport recalled that the first tune the Butterfield Band played was “Yonders Wall,” after which the crowd went wild. The band’s first shows at the Fillmore were such a success that Bill Graham arranged with Albert Grossman to have exclusive rights to book the band in the San Francisco area. On March 28, Paul Butterfield was a guest on the CBS program “To Tell the Truth” in New York City, an appearance probably arranged by manager Albert Grossman. After he identified himself as the real harmonica player, Paul performed “Born in Chicago” with the Norman Paris quartet.

 

Personnel as February 4.
Golden Bear, Huntington Beach, CA; April 1-10, 1966

Unknown titles                                    Live performance

 

Personnel as February 4.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; April 15, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as February 4.

Harmon Gymnasium, University of California, Berkeley, CA; April 16, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as February 4.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; April 17, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as February 4.
Recreation Hall, Penn State University, State College, PA; April 24, 1966

Unknown titles                                       Live performance

Personnel as February 4.

SUNY Stony Brook, LI, NY; April 25, 1966

 

Born in Chicago                                  Live performance

Blues with a Feeling

Thank You Mister Poobah

Mellow Down Easy

Never Say No

Other unknown titles

 

Thanks to Jim Miller for these titles. Simon & Garfunkel were the headliners for this show.


Personnel as February 4.

The Living End, Detroit, MI; April 26-May 8, 1966

 

A series of photographs of the Butterfield Band performing at The Living End in Detroit may have come from these dates, or may date from an earlier appearance there because they show Mark Naftalin still using the prototype Guild organ that he played on the band’s first record. Curiously, Bloomfield is also shown playing a 1955(?) Les Paul with a Bigsby tailpiece, not the 1954 gold-top model – and playing harmonica(!).

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

*MICHAEL BLOOMFIELD
Michael Bloomfield, g, hca, v; Norman Dayon, v, hca; Betty Dayron, v.
Norman Dayron’s apartment, Hyde Park, IL; May 10, 1966

Raga Improvisation                                  Private recording
Country Blues Medley
Farther Along We'll Understand Why
New River Train
Slow Jimmy Reed Blues
Left My Mama Blues (incomplete)

 
Bloomfield was visiting his friend Norman Dayron during a Butterfield Band stopover in Chicago to do several weeks at Poor Richard's, and they made this casual recording. The second version of "East-West," released on Winner, comes from this time, and Michael is clearly thinking about Indian music in his first improvisation here.


*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Big John's, Chicago, IL; Early May


Unknown titles                                    Live performances


Down Beat reported in its June 16 issue that the PBBB had returned for a week at Big John's, the club where "it had all started."


Personnel as above. Michael Bloomfield, v*; Sam Lay, v**; Elvin Bishop, v***; Jerome Arnold, v****.

Poor Richard’s, Chicago, IL; May 12-22, 1966

 

Natural Ball #1*
All These Blues #1
Juke
River’s Invitation #1
Born in Chicago #1
Work Song #1
Medley Intro/Look Over Yonders Wall #1
Just to Be with You
Walking Blues
Midnight Hour****
Walkin’ Through the Park**
Got My Mojo Working #1**
Get Out of My Life Woman #1
Raga (East-West) (incomplete) #1
Got My Mojo Working #2**
(incomplete)
Got a Mind to Give Up Living #1
I’m Ready
River’s Invitation #2
Feel It*
(incomplete)
All These Blues #2
Shake Your Money Maker
Work Song #2
Get Out of My Life Woman #2
Danger Zone #1***
Got My Mojo Working #3**
River’s Invitation #3
Born in Chicago #2
(incomplete)
Instrumental
(Cha Cha in Blues?) (incomplete)
All These Blues #3
Natural Ball* (incomplete)
Work Song #3 (incomplete)
Get Out of My Life Woman #3
Keep Loving Me Baby
Medley Intro/Look Over Yonders Wall #2
(incomplete)
Got My Mojo Working #4**
Get Out of My Life Woman #4
Raga (East-West) #2
                                          “East-West Live,” Winner 447
Got a Mind to Give Up Living #2
(incomplete)
Danger Zone #2***
(incomplete)
You’re So Fine****
Watermelom Man
   

 

These titles were recorded by guitarist and technician Dan Erlewine. They come from what appears to be three or four different sets, probably recorded over several days. Erlewine has stated that he and his brother recorded “hours of Butterfield” during this period and that Mark Naftalin has had the tapes restored. Aside from “Raga (East-West) #2” which was released on Winner 447, they remain unissued. A brief review of a show at Poor Richard’s appeared in the June 1 edition of Variety and described the band’s performance of a piece called “The Ragga” (sic) as “outstanding,” and Billboard magazine cited a Butterfield Band stay at the club from the above dates. Jack Walroth, known as "Applejack," sat in with the Butterfield Band on "East-West" one night when they were at Poor Richard's. Thanks to Mark Naftalin and Peggy McVickar for some of this information.


Personnel as above.

Unknown venue, Madison, WI; Summer 1966

Unknown titles
                                    Live performance

In an interview with Bill Keenom, Billy Davenport recalled that the band performed in Madison following its stay on the West Coast. The club may have been The Factory.

 

Personnel as above.
Royal Arms, Buffalo, NY; 1966(?)

Unknown titles
                                    Live performance

Mark Naftalin recalled that the Butterfield Band played at the Royal Arms in Buffalo at some point in the band’s early years. The gig is included here in the listings though the date is uncertain.
 

 

Personnel as above.
Unicorn Coffee House, Boston, MA; Spring (May 18?) 1966

 

Look Over Yonders Wall                                Coliseum UCH1966 (Bootleg)

Born In Chicago                                                         

Blues with a Feeling (Love Her with a Feeling)                  

Get Out of My Life, Woman (Walking Blues)                       

Never Say No                                                

One More Heartache                                     

Work Song                                                     

Coming Home Baby                       

Serves You Right to Suffer                                       

I Got a Mind to Give Up Living                                  

Walking By Myself                             

If You See My Baby                                   

World Is in an Uproar (Danger Zone)                                             

In the Midnight Hour                                                

So Fine                                              

Got My Mojo Working                        

 

Elvin Bishop is the vocalist on “Never Say No,” Bloomfield sings “If You See My Baby” and Arnold sings "Midnight Hour." Bloomfield does not play on "Coming Home Baby."

 

Personnel as May 18.
Unknown club, Falmouth, MA; Summer(?) 1966

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

Mark Naftalin recalled the Butterfield Band playing in Falmouth (or East Falmouth) around this time.

  

Personnel as May 12.

Cafe Au Go Go, New York, NY; June 3-18, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Also on the bill for this two-week engagement were Albert King and B.B. King, and folk/rock artist Fred Neil. In Neil's band were Harvey Brooks, Al Kooper and John Sebastian.

 

*MICHAEL BLOOMFIELD/PETE WELDING
Michael Bloomfield, g, hca, v
; Pete Welding, g.
Norman Dayron’s apartment, Hyde Park, IL; June 17, 1966

Blues #1                                          
  Private recording
Blues #2 (Blues in C)
Blues #3
Blues #4 (Blues Vamp)
Blues #5 (Slow Blues)
Never Say No
 
The date for this recording is given as above, though the Butterfield Band was supposedly still at the Cafe Au Go Go. Pete Welding, a music critic and editor at Downbeat magazine, was a close friend of Bloomfield. He proves himself here to be a capable guitar player. German record producer and author Chris Strachwitz (later owner of Arhoolie Records) and Norman Dayron are heard conversing in the background in the latter part of this recording. Norman at one point says something to Michael about going to the studio and Michael doesn't want to go because he's too tired to record. This was right around the time the PBBB recorded "East-West" at Chess, and perhaps the trip to the studio was for that purpose. Interestingly, Michael sings "Never Say No," a Percy Mayfield tune that Elvin Bishop would later record with the band.

PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND
Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Club 47, Cambridge, MA; June 20-25, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Crawdaddy magazine interviewed the Butterfield Band at Club 47 on June 24.

 

Personnel as June 20.

Cafe Au Go Go, New York, NY; July 1-10, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

The Blues Project was also on the roster for this gig.

 

Bloomfield hears Jimi Hendrix for the first time at Cafe Wha? in New York in July 1966. Hendrix is performing as Jimmy James and the Blue Flames. Bloomfield reports to members of the Butterfield Band that he has just seen a guitarist “way better than I am.” Hendrix occasionally sits in with the Butterfield Band during the Cafe Au Go Go’s Sunday evening “Blues Bag” jam sessions. Also in July 1966, John Mayall releases “John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers” with Eric Clapton.

 

Personnel as June 20.

The Living End, Detroit, MI; July 19, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as June 20.
Cafe Au Go Go, New York, NY; July 27-August 7, 1966

Unknown titles                                    Live performances

Thanks to Bruno Ceriotti for this information.

 

Personnel as June 20.

The Living End, Detroit, MI; August 9-14, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

  

Personnel as June 20.

Rheingold Central Park Music Festival, Wollman Rink, New York, NY; August 26, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as June 20.
Cafe Au Go Go, New York, NY; August 27-September 4, 1966

Unknown titles                                    Live performances

Thanks to Bruno Ceriotti for this information.

 

*CARLY SIMON

Simon, v, g; Michael Bloomfield, g; Robbie Robertson, g; Richard Manuel, Paul Griffin, kybds; Rick Danko, b; Levon Helm, d; Richie Havens, bkgnd v.

New York, NY(?); 1966

 

Baby Let Me Follow You Down          Columbia, unreleased

Goodbye Lovin’ Man

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

New York, NY, Chicago, IL and Los Angeles, CA; Recorded summer 1966; released August 1966

 

Walkin’ Blues                                      “East-West,” Elektra EKS-7315

Get Out of My Life, Woman                                   

I Got A Mind to Give Up Living                                         

All These Blues                                                                 

Work Song                                                            

Mary, Mary                                                           

Two Trains Running                                              

Never Say No                                                       

East-West                                                             

Come On In                                          Elektra 45609

If I Had My Way                                   Unreleased     

Raga                                                     Unreleased 

 

“East-West” was edited down for release. It was recorded in Chicago at Chess Studios by Ron Malo, possibly with Norman Dayron’s assistance. “Mary, Mary,” a tune written by Michael Nesmith of the Monkees, and “Come On In,” credited to Butterfield, Bloomfield and Bishop, were produced by the Butterfield Band in an effort to chart a commercial hit. “Mary, Mary” was done in Los Angeles with producer Barry Friedman while “Come On In” was recorded in Chicago in September. The former tune originally had jazz pianist and vibes player Victor Feldman playing tympani on it, but he was later edited out. The latter tune was released as a single. The Monkees recorded “Mary, Mary” themselves in July 1966, but it was not released until January 1967. “Raga” was a short version of “East-West,” slightly over two minutes long, that featured soprano voices and violin. Thanks to Mark Naftalin for these details.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Philadelphia Folk Festival(?), Paoli, PA; September 1966

 

Unknown titles                                               Live performance

 

It is uncertain whether the Butterfield Band actually appeared for a second time at the Philadelphia Folk Festival, but a story about Butterfield in the November 11, 1973, edition of Rolling Stone seems to imply they did.

 

*The Chicago Loop

Judy Novy, Bob Slawson, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Barry Goldberg, org; Carmine Riale, b; John Siomos, d.

Chicago, IL(?); Released September 1966

 

When She Needs Good Lovin’            Dyno-Voice 226                   

 

“When She Needs Good Lovin’” was used in a Macleans toothpaste commercial, “Macleans Is What’s Happening!,” in 1966.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Monterey Jazz Festival, Monterey, CA; September 17, 1966

 

Never Say No                                   Live performance

Other unknown titles

 

The Butterfield Band performed as part of Monterey’s Saturday afternoon show hosted by Jon Hendricks and called “Blues All the Way.” Also featured were Big Mama Thornton, Walter Horton, Muddy Waters, Memphis Slim and the Jefferson Airplane. A jam at the end of the afternoon that was to feature Muddy Waters, members of the Airplane and the Butterfield Band was cancelled due to time constraints.

 

Personnel as September 17.

Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA; September 23-24, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

The Muddy Waters Band was also on the roster for this performance.

 

Personnel as September 17.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; September 25, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as September 17.

Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA; September 30, 1966

 

Dropping Out                          “Droppin’ in with ...,” (Bootleg CD)

Baby, Please Don't Go                                               

Our Love Is Drifting                                      

Born In Chicago                                                        

Willow Tree                                                  

My Babe                                                         

Kansas City                                                    

Work Song                 

 

Bloomfield is the vocalist on "Kansas City."                                  

 

Personnel as September 17.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; October 1, 2, 1966

 

Got My Mojo Working                             Live performances
Other unknown titles

Muddy Waters was also on the bill for these shows. On October 2, he jammed with Butterfield on “Mojo.” The shows were originally to have taken place at the Winterland, but on September 27 a white policeman killed a black teenager and the Fillmore district was very tense. Bill Graham thought he would not be able to fill the larger ballroom. Thanks to Corry Arnold for this information.

 

Personnel as October 1.
Basketball Pavilion, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; October 6, 1966

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

*JEFFERSON AIRPLANE

Marty Balin, Signe Anderson, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Paul Kantner, g, v; Jack Casady, b; Spencer Dryden, d.

Basketball Pavilion, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; October 6, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Both Butterfield and the Airplane were featured at this Stanford University show. Bloomfield sat in with the Airplane, using Jorma Kaukonen’s Guild guitar.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g, v; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA; October 7, 8, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

The Jefferson Airplane was also on the bill for these shows. According to Wolfgang’s Vault, the Airplane and the Butterfield Band played their second sets together. Steve Miller may have also jammed with them on one of the two nights.

 

Personnel as October 7.
Pacific Jazz Festival, Orange County Fairgrounds, Costa Mesa, CA; October 8, 1966

                                                        Performance cancelled

Jimmy Lyons, producer of the Monterey Jazz Festival, organized the performers for the debut of this festival and intended to repeat the “Blues All the Way” program (minus the Jefferson Airplane) that had been presented at Monterey. Leonard Feather, in his review of the festival in the L.A. Times, reported that Butterfield and company did not appear.
 

Personnel as October 7.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; October 9, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as October 7.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; October 14, 1966

 

Shake Your Money Maker                  “Droppin’ in with ...,” (Bootleg CD)

The Sky Is Crying                                                      

Oh, Pretty Woman                                         

Help Me                                                          

Never Say No                                                

So Fine                                                           

East-West 

 

"East-West" fades midway through its third section. Jerome Arnold appears to be the vocalist on "So Fine." Elvin Bishop sings "Never Say No."

 

Personnel as October 7.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; October 15, 16, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

ERIC CLAPTON forms Cream in the summer of 1966; “Fresh Cream” is released in October of that year. Jimi Hendrix moves to London in September 1966. Bloomfield plays with Clapton and other English guitarists while on tour there in October and November with the Butterfield Band.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND & CREAM

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, Eric Clapton, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, Jack Bruce, b; Billy Davenport, Ginger Baker, d.

Cromwellian or The Scotch of St. James, London, England; October 19, 1966

 

Unknown titles                            Live performance

 

The Butterfield Band visited England and Scotland initially as a part of the Georgie Fame Tour, along with Chris Farlowe, Eric Burdon and others. The band arrived in London on October 17 and gave a press conference at Ronnie Scott’s jazz club during which Bloomfield praised Eric Clapton. According to author Christopher Hjort, the band jammed with Cream on October 19 at one of the clubs mentioned above. The tour was in support of Butterfield's recently released Elektra album “East-West.”

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Finsbury Park, London, England; October 20, 1966

 

Unknown titles                            Live performance

 

The Butterfield Band began its tour with this performance. An article in Melody Maker reported that the band played with borrowed equipment for their initial gigs and were very unhappy with their sound; presumably the band’s Fender amps arrived in time for the later shows. Thanks to René Aagaard for the following listings.

 

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Birmingham, England; October 21, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Leeds, England; October 22, 1966

 

Bloomfield met up with Eric Clapton a second time after the Butterfield Band’s gig in Leeds. He and Clapton played together briefly backstage between Cream’s sets at nearby Leeds University. Thanks to Christopher Hjort for this information.

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Gaumont, Doncaster, England; October 23, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Manchester, England; October 25, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Liverpool, England; October 26, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Gaumont, Sheffield, England; October 27, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Colston Hall, Bristol, England; October 28, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Cheltenham, England; October 29, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Gaumont, Southhampton, England; October 31, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Bolton, England; November 1, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
ABC, Carlisle, England; November 2, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Glasgow, England; November 3, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Newcastle, England; November 4, 1966

Born in Chicago                         Live performance
Blues with a Feeling
Shake Your Moneymaker
Got My Mojo Working


Thanks to David Fletcher for these titles. Fletcher, an Animals fan, went to this performance to see Eric Burden and was amazed by Bloomfield and the Butterfield Band.

Personnel as October 20.
Gaumont, Hanley, England; November 5, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Odeon, Leicester, England; November 6, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance


This was the last date scheduled for the Fame Tour. Butterfield and company decided to stay on to play clubs around London for two more weeks.


Personnel as October 20.
Blaises Club, London, England; November 8, 9(?), 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance


Eric Clapton caught the Butterfield band’s second set at the Blaises Club on
November 8.


Personnel as October 20.
Marquee Club, London, England; November 10, 1966

East-West                                Live performance

Got My Mojo Working

Other unknown titles


"Mojo" was an encore. Melody Maker reported in a brief review of the band's performance that the club was "packed up to the hilt" and the "appreciative blues fans ... even applauded the solos."

Personnel as October 20.
University Union, Manchester University, Manchester, England; November 12, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
The Jigsaw Club, Manchester, England; November 12, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance


Martin Davies, a student at Manchester University in 1966, attended both of Butterfield’s Manchester performances on November 12. He recalls that the second gig that evening may have actually taken place at a club called the Staxx and not at the Jigsaw. Jim Deen, who also attended both Manchester shows, reports that the band did indeed play at the Jigsaw and not the Staxx, and that they played one long and intense set.

Personnel as October 20.
Ram Jam Club, Brixton, England; November 13, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Cooks Ferry Inn, Edmonton, England; November 14, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance


Personnel as October 20.
Eel Pie Island Hotel, Eel Pie Island, London, England; November 15(?), 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Mark Naftalin recalled performing at this venue, a favorite place for British bands like the Rolling Stones and the Who to play. The hotel was on Eel Pie Island in the middle of the Thames River, and was reached by a foot bridge. Naftalin remembered that all the band's equipment had to wheeled across the bridge.


Personnel as October 20.
Ritz and Plaza, Birmingham, England; November 16, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Ritz, Skewen, England; November 17, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
The Refectory, London, England; November 18, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance


Paul Butterfield joined John Mayall and his Bluesbreakers in the studios for an afternoon session on November 18 to record four titles for Decca. Mark Naftalin and other members of the Butterfield band watched the proceedings but Bloomfield was not present.

Personnel as October 20.
Flamingo Club, London, England; November 18, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
Golders Green, London, England; November 18, 1966

Unknown titles                         Live performance

Personnel as October 20.
“Ready, Steady, Go,”
Granada Television, BBC; London, England; Aired November 18, 1966

Come On In                                TV broadcast
 


This performance was recorded November 15 and lip-synced. Some sources suggest the tune performed may have been “I’m Droppin’ Out on You,” also known as “Droppin’ Out.” The Four Tops were also the show.

 

Personnel as October 20.
Lewes Town Hall, Lewes, England; November 19, 1966

Unknown titles                           Live performance

Personnel as October 20.

Town Hall, New York, NY; November 26, 1966

 

Help Me                                      Live performance

Mystery Train
Shake Your Money Maker
Walkin’ By Myself
Work Song
East-West

 

A New York Times review of this performance complained that the band was so loud that the reviewer “had to move into the foyer after the third number.”

 

Personnel as October 20.
ABC studios, New York, NY(?); Probably late 1966

Unknown titles                     “Stage 67”(?), TV broadcast

Billy Davenport told Felix Cabrera that the Butterfield Band performed on this variety show along with Dionne Warwick. The date is uncertain, but the program only ran one season and none of the aired shows features Butterfield or Warwick. It is possible that the show was recorded for use in the cancelled second season and shelved or perhaps used in the ABC special “The Songmakers,” aired February 1967.

 

Personnel as October 20.

Unknown venue, location; Winter 1966(?)

I'm Droppin' Out on You

The source for this remarkable bit of music speculates that it derives from the Butterfield Band's appearance on the music program, "Ready, Steady, Go," during the last days of their visit to England. Other sources, however, claim that the band played "Come On In," their latest single release for Elektra. The fact that this is a live rendition of "Droppin'," and at the time all of RSG's artists lip-synched their performances, seems to indicate that there must be another location and date for it. It might well be an appearance that, according to Billy Davenport, the band made on "Stage 67" in December 1966, an ABC variety show that was cancelled before their segment aired.

 

Personnel as October 20.

The Matrix(?), San Francisco, CA; December 1, 1966

 

I Feel So Bad                                     Live performance

Driftin’ & Driftin’

300 Pounds of Heavenly Joy

Reconsider Baby

The Road I Travel

Get Out of My Life, Woman

One More Heartache

In the Midnight Hour

Walkin’ by Myself

Born In Chicago

Got My Mojo Working

 

Bloomfield is the vocalist on “Reconsider Baby,” Bishop sings ”The Road” and Jerome Arnold sings “Midnight Hour.” The arrangement of “Mojo” is by jazz organist Jimmy Smith. Though all sources name the venue for this show as the Matrix, Mark Naftalin doubts the Butterfield Band ever played there when he was with the group. Aural evidence also suggests the club was a much larger space, perhaps the Winterland or Carousel Ballrooms.

 

Personnel as October 20.

Cafe Au Go Go, New York, NY; December 5-11, 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as October 20.

Le Hibou, Ottawa, Canada; 1966

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as October 20.
Gould Memorial Library Auditorium, NYU, University Heights, NY; December 16, 1966

Unknown titles                                     Live performance

 

*BARRY GOLDBERG
Goldberg, kybds, g, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Frank Zappa, g; others unknown.
New York, NY; mid-December 1966

Carry On                                                Verve/Folkways KF5045

According to Zappa, he played “the chords, and Bloomfield played the screeches” on this Goldberg title. It was issued on a 45-rpm single backed with “Ronnie Siegel from Avenue L.” Discograhper Rene Aagaard has determined by comparing matrix numbers that “Carry On” was recorded sometime just prior to December 21. Tom Wilson, who had produced several of Dylan’s “Highway 61” sessions, was its producer.

 

VOTERS IN the 1966 Playboy Jazz Poll rank Bloomfield thirteenth in the guitar category, higher than any other rock or blues guitarist. By 1969, he is ranked number eight.

 

1967


*The JEFFERSON AIRPLANE

Marty Balin, Grace Slick, v; Jorma Kaukonen, Michael Bloomfield, g; Paul Kantner, v, g; Barry Goldberg, org; Jack Casady, b, Spencer Dryden, d.

Webster Hall, New York, NY; January 8, 1967

 

Reconsider Baby                                   Bootleg CD 

East-West Jam                                                                 

 

This concert was part of RCA’s “Promotional Night.” The Airplane was making its East Coast debut. Bloomfield and Naftalin sat in, probably as a favor to Bill Graham whom the Airplane had hired as a promoter. Some sources list Little Walter’s “Hate to See You Go,” but the correct title is Lowell Fulson’s “Reconsider Baby.”  Most listings for this show have Mark Naftalin on organ, but photographic evidence indicates the player is Goldberg.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Jordan Hall, Boston, MA; January 13, 14, 1967

Unknown titles                                 Live performances

These concerts also featured Otis Rush and were produced by Club 47 in Cambridge. Guitarist John Curtis recalled seeing the band perform at Club 47 around this time, so Butterfield may have done a week there in addition to the Jordan Hall shows.

Personnel as January 13.
Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; January 20-22, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

*FILLMORE JAM
Michael Bloomfield, p; Jerry Garcia, g, v; Carlos Santana, Paul Kantner, g; Jack Casady, b; others, if any, unknown.
Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; January 22 or 29, 1967

Unknown titles                                    Live performance

Carlos Santana told author Bill Keenom that he sat in on a Fillmore jam session one Sunday afternoon when he was still working as a dishwasher. The occasion was a Paul Butterfield Blues Band Band gig (Charles Lloyd's group was also on the bill). Butterfield was present but did not play, “having been dosed with something” according to Santana. Carlos played Bloomfield’s guitar, and on the strength of his performance was offered a slot by Bill Graham as an opener for an upcoming show (Santana recalled that it was to be for the Steve Miller Band). But he was diagnosed with tuberculosis in April and was hospitalized until June, so he was unable to take Graham up on his offer until June 16 when the Santana Blues Band opened for the Who. Thanks to Bruno Ceriotti for some of this information.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; January 27-29, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Personnel as January 27. Michael Bloomfield, v*; Elvin Bishop, v**; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, v***.

Golden Bear, Huntington Beach, CA; January 31-February 12, 1967

 

East-West #3                                 “East-West Live,” Winner 447

Tollin’ Bells                                     “Strawberry Jam,” Winner 448            

Come On in This House                                             

Born in Chicago

Coming Home (Coming Home Baby?)
Feel So Bad
Drifting Blues (Driftin’ & Driftin’?)
Evil
All My Loving**
Rocks Was My Pillow**
One More Heartache
Tollin’ Bells #2
Here Am I*
In the Midnight Hour***
Love Me or Leave Me**
Tollin’ Bells #3
300 Pounds of Heavenly Joy
Our Love Is Drifiting
Serves Me Right to Suffer
Tore Down**
Nobody Loves Me*

These titles come from tapes owned by Mark Naftalin. Several tunes have been issued on his Winner label but the rest remain unreleased. “Here Am I” is a Ray Charles song featuring Naftalin’s piano and Bloomfield’s vocal. Thanks to Mark Naftalin for this information.
   


Personnel as January 27.
Golden Bear(?), Huntington Beach, CA; January 31-February 12, 1967

Work Song

This extraordinary performance has been listed as having taken place in Mark Naftalin's apartment in 1965. It's doubtful, however, that Naftalin had an apartment at this time, and aural evidence indicates that the venue is a good-sized club. Because the degree of tonal experimentation approximates that of the third version of "East-West" on the Winner "East-West Live" CD, an educated guess might place this version of "Work Song" at the same club at the same time – the Golden Bear in Huntington Beach. In any case, it's almost certainly from a late PBBB-with-Bloomfield performance. Sound quality is not the best and the recording ends just as Elvin Bishop begins his solo.

  

*BARRY GOLDBERG
Goldberg, kybds, g, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Frank Zappa, g; others unknown.
New York, NY; February 15, 1967

Ronnie Siegel From Avenue L                    Verve/Folkways KF5045

This title was issued on the flip side of a 45-rpm single with "Carry On," recorded in mid-December 1966.

  

Personnel as January 27.
ABC-TV Studios, New York, NY(?); Aired February 24, 1967

Born in Chicago                                 TV broadcast

This was a program called “The Songmakers,” a special ABC show about the process of creating of pop music. It also featured the Mamas & the Papas, the Blues Project, Judy Collins, the Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, Dionne Warwick and Smokey Robinson & the Miracles. The Butterfield Band’s segment was probably recorded at an earlier date, perhaps originally for the cancelled program “Stage 67.”

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Elvin Bishop, g; Mark Naftalin, org; Jerome Arnold, b; Billy Davenport, d.

MIT, Cambridge, MA; February 25, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as January 27.

Sargent Gym, Boston University, Boston, MA; February 25, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as January 27.

Commonwealth Armory, Boston, MA; February 25, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

According to Mark Naftalin, Bloomfield officially quit the Paul Butterfield Blues Band after having to play these three performances on February 25. The MIT show was part of the university’s IFC Weekend and ran from noon to 4 p.m., and the BU show started at 8:30 p.m.; the Jim Kewskin Jug Band was also on the bill for the Armory show. Both Boston shows were produced by Peter Casperson, then a nineteen-year-old newcomer to the music industry, and he recalls that the band's agency was responsible for the overbooking that day. Casperson also has said that when the group arrived, Bloomfield said they were "just too tired to do two shows" and asked if the band could substitute one long "really good set" instead. Casperson responded by giving them a case of beer and an ounce of grass, after which they did both shows. Thanks to Corry Arnold for contributing to this entry.

 

*EDDIE “CLEANHEAD” VINSON

Vinson, as, v; Buddy Lucas, ts, hca; Michael Bloomfield, g; Patti Bown, p, org; unknown g, b, d. 

New York, NY; March 1967

 

Cherry Red                                          “Cherry Red,” Bluesway BL-6007

Cadillac Blues                                                                    

Juice Head Baby*                                                              

Alimony Blues*                                                                  

Somebody’s Got to Go                                                       

Flat Broke Blues*                                                              

Old Maid Got Married                                           

Workin’ Blues*                                                                    

Wee Baby Blues                                                                

Good Night Baby Blues*                                                     

 

Bloomfield only plays on these tunes(*). The album was released in the first week of May 1967.

 

*Mitch Ryder

Ryder, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Hugh McCracken, g; Barry Goldberg, p, org; Carmine Riale, b; John Siomos, d; unknown hns, bckup v.

New York, NY; March(?) 1967

 

What Now My Love                            “What Now My Love,” Dyno-Voice DY 31901

Let It Be Me                                                           

I Make a Fool of Myself                                                     

Born to Lose                                                          

If You Go Away                                                                

Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On*

Sally Go ‘Round the Roses*

Brown-eyed Handsome Man*

I Need Lovin’ You*

That’s It, I Quit*  

 

Bloomfield may only play on these titles (*). This session was produced by Bob Crewe. It was after this date that Michael supposedly proposed to Barry Goldberg that they form an "American music" band.

 

*The Chicago Loop

Judy Novy, Bob Slawson, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Barry Goldberg, org; Carmine Riale, b; John Siomos, d.

New York, NY(?); 1967

 

Richard Corey                                     Dyno-Voice 230

Cloudy

 

It is unclear when these tunes were recorded – they could have been done during the Chicago Loop’s first session in the summer of 1966. Rene Aagaard lists John Savanno as the guitarist, though other sources credit Bloomfield and give the year as 1967. 

 

*JAMES COTTON BLUES BAND

Cotton, hca, v; Luther Tucker, g; Michael Bloomfield, prod; Alberto Gianguinto, p; Robert Anderson, b, v; Sam Lay, d; James Barge, ts; Paul Serrano, tp; Delbert Hill, Gene Easton, bar; Louis Satterfield, tbn.

Universal Studios, Chicago, IL, March 1967

 

Various titles                        “The James Cotton Blues Band,” Verve FTS-3023

 

Bloomfield, Barry Goldberg and Norman Dayron produced this session and composed several of its titles. This recording features Cotton playing blues with a horn section, not unlike what Bloomfield was about to do with the Electric Flag.

 

BLOOMFIELD forms the Electric Flag in the spring of 1967. He moves permanently to the San Francisco area. In May of that year, “Are You Experienced?” is released by the Jimi Hendrix Experience.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD/MICHAEL BLOOMFIELD/ERIC CLAPTON
Butterfield, v, hca; Michael Bloomfield, Elvin Bishop, Eric Clapton, g; Mark Naftalin, kybds; Jerome Arnold, Jack Bruce, b; Billy Davenport, Ginger Baker, d; Mitch Ryder, v
Cafe Au Go-Go, New York, NY; April 9(?), 1967

Unknown titles                             Live performance

One of the Cafe Au Go-Go’s Sunday jam sessions, this remarkable billing was advertised as a jam session between the Butterfield Band and Cream with Bloomfield added for good measure. Mitch Ryder also sat in. Whether Michael was still in New York at the time, however, is uncertain. Thanks to Peggy McVickar for this information.

 

*The ELECTRIC FLAG
Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, perc; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Nick Gravenites, v, g, conga.
Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA; late April 1967

Unknown titles                             Live performance

Producer Chet Helms visited the Flag at the Castle where they were staying in the Hollywood Hills during the recording of the soundtrack for “The Trip.” He recalled participating in a jam session (which Bloomfield did not participate in) at the mansion right after the Flag had “played a show at the Whisky A Go Go.” The occasion was a party given by the band, an event that was attended by Nico, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda and possibly Jack Nicholson and Augustus Stanley Owsley. Though it’s hard to believe that the band would have been able to perform a full set of music at this early date, both Harvey Brooks and Barry Goldberg recalled the Whisky appearance in conversation with Bruno Ceriotti. Because chronologies for the club have no performers listed for the second and third weeks of April 1967, the performance was likely to have been then. Thanks to Bill Keenom and Bruno Ceriotti for this information.


*The ELECTRIC FLAG

Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org, p, hrpscd; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, perc; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Nick Gravenites, v, g; Paul Beaver, moog syn; Bobby Notkoff, el viol.

Los Angeles, CA; April/May 1967

 

Peter’s Trip                             “Soundtrack to The Trip,” Sidewalk ST-5908 

Psyche Soap                                                          

M-23                                                                      

Synesthesia                                                           

Hobbit                                                                   

Fewghh                                                                

Green and Gold                                                                    

Flash, Bam, Pow                                                                

Home Room                                                           

Practice Music                                                                      

Fine Jung Thing                                                                     

Senior Citizen                                                                    

Peter Gets Off                                                                   

Gettin' Hard                                                           

Joint Passing                                                         

A Little Head                                                          

The Other Ed Norton                                             

  

The International Submarine Band, a Gram Parsons group, was originally chosen to provide music for “The Trip.” That band appears in the film with the Electric Flag’s music overdubbed. The Flag used Parson’s Laurel Canyon home as an early rehearsal space. A portion of "Flash, Bam, Pow" is heard during road scenes in Dennis Hopper's "Easy Rider” (1969). The recording was one of the first (if not the first) to feature the new Moog synthesizer. “The Trip" opened in August 1967 to mixed reviews and was eventually banned by the National Catholic Office of Motion Pictures for sensationalizing drug use and for scenes of nudity.

 

BLOOMFIELD replaces his 1954 gold top Les Paul with a 1959 sunburst version in the spring of 1967.

 

*The ELECTRIC FLAG

Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org, p; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Nick Gravenites, v, conga.

Monterey Pop Festival, Monterey, CA; June 17, 1967

 

Introduction by Bloomfield

Drinkin’ Wine                                      “Old Glory: The Best of ...,” Sony Legacy CD 

The Night Time Is the Right Time                                    

Groovin’ Is Easy

Over-Lovin' You

Bloomfield introducing The Byrds

 

The Electric Flag arrived several days early for the festival and rehearsed their set in Buddy’s Miles’ motel room. Barry Goldberg recalled that the band played “Over-Lovin’ You” in addition to the other known titles. The band’s entire Monterey performance was filmed by D.A. Pennebaker for his 1968 film, “Monterey Pop.” During viewing sessions of the raw footage at Max’s Kansas City in New York in the fall of 1967, Pennebaker related how Truman Capote happened by and, on seeing Bloomfield and company on the screen, said, “Oh, don’t they look tacky!” Pennebaker responded that Capote didn’t know anything about music and Truman replied, “I may not know music, but I know tacky.” Pennebaker later removed the Flag’s section and decided that the film worked better without them. Following the band’s Monterey performance, Bloomfield decided to change the group’s name to “Thee, Sound.” Grossman and Columbia no doubt persuaded him to stick with “Electric Flag.”

 

*THE ELECTRIC FLAG
Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Herbie Rich, bar; Nick Gravenites, v.
Columbia Studios, San Francisco, CA; July 1967

Groovin’ Is Easy                             “A Long Time Comin’,” Columbia CS-9597

Over-Lovin' You

“Groovin’ Is Easy” was the first title recorded by the Flag for its Columbia album which would eventually come out 9 months later in April 1968. Though listed as Ron Polte, the composer of this tune is actually Nick Gravenites. Mama Cass sings backup vocals with Buddy Miles. The tune was released as a single backed with “Over-Lovin’ You” in mid-October 1967.

 

*Jam SESSION
David Crosby, Steve Stills, Richie Furay, g, v; Michael Bloomfield, g; Bruce Palmer, b; Buddy Miles, Mike Clark, d; Dewey Martin, v.
Hullabaloo Club, Los Angeles, CA; July 1, 1967

Hey Joe                                                Live performance
Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing
For What It’s Worth
Other unknown titles


The Los Angeles Times reported this session with members of the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield, describing Bloomfield and Miles as members of the Mike Bloomfield Blues Band.


*THE ELECTRIC FLAG

Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org, p; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Herbie Rich, as, bar; Nick Gravenites, v, perc.

Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA; July 12, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Personnel as July 12.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; August 8-13, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Personnel as July 12.
Hollywood Bowl, Hollywood, CA; August 18, 1967

Performance cancelled

The Flag was originally scheduled to perform at the Mamas and the Papas’ Hollywood Bowl show along with Scott McKenzie and the Jimi Hendrix Experience,
but Albert Grossman was unable to come to terms with the producers. Bloomfield may also have been uncomfortable with the lingering Monterey hype surrounding the headliners. A classical string quartet replaced the Flag on the bill.


Personnel as August 8.
Electric Circus, Los Angeles, CA; September (?) 1967

Unknown titles                                    Live performances

Joel Harlib recalled seeing the Flag perform at the Circus. The date is uncertain.

 

Personnel as August 8.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; August 29-September 3, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Cream, making its West Coast debut, shared the bill with the Flag for this performance. For the August 29 show, an unknown alto player replaced Marcus Doubleday. Dan Erlewine reported that Bloomfield asked that Erlewine’s band, the Prime Movers, substitute for the Flag for one of these shows because Barry Goldberg was ill. It was the Prime Movers’ first West Coast gig, and Erlewine recalled they were thrilled to be opening for Cream.


*THE ELECTRIC FLAG
Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Herbie Rich, bar; Nick Gravenites, v; plus Richie Havens, sitar; Paul Beaver, moog syn; Bobby Notkoff, Julius Held, Leo Daruczek, George Brown, Charles McCracken, vi; Sivuca, g.
Columbia Studios, San Francisco, CA; September 1967

She Should Have Just                         “A Long Time Comin’,” Columbia CS-9597
Sittin’ in Circles
You Don’t Realize
Sittin’ in Circles, alt. take                    “Old Glory,” Columbia Columbia CK-57629
Goin’ Down Slow                                 “A Long Time Comin’,” Columbia CK-9597
 

*THE ELECTRIC FLAG

Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg, org, p; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Peter Strazza, ts; Nick Gravenites, v, perc.

Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA; September 7-10, 1967

Intro/I'm Sick Ya'll                             Live performances
My Baby Wants to Test Me
You Don’t Realize
Killing Floor
Groovin’ Is Easy
Other unknown titles


Four of these tunes have been issued by various labels as “The Best of the Electric Flag,” “Small Town Blues” or “The Electric Flag Live.” They were professionally recorded on September 10 by a Los Angeles company called Recording Riedel, though for what purpose remains unclear. Aural evidence indicates that only two horns were present. “My Baby” may be a topical blues by Bloomfield, describing the state of his marriage in late 1967. “Killing Floor” is mislabeled as “I Should Have Left Her” on some issues.


Personnel as September 7.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; September 14-16, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Personnel as September 7.
Golden Bear, Huntington Beach, CA; September 29-October 1, October 3-8, 1967

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

Rolling Stone reported in its debut issue that Flag members Bloomfield, Brooks, Goldberg and Gravenites had been arrested on “narcotics charges” during a 10-day gig at the Golden Bear. Their court date was set for October 20 in Huntington Beach. Only Barry Goldberg was later convicted on the charges, taking the fall for his Flag band members because the illegal activity took place in his room at the motel. He was originally sentenced to 90 days in the Orange County jail and 3 years probation in April 1970 but the sentence was later reduced to probation alone. Thanks to Marc Skobac for these dates.


Personnel as September 7.
Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, CA; October 5, 1967

Unknown titles                                     Live performance

Personnel as September 22.
KGO-TV, San Francisco, CA; Early October 1967

Unknown titles
                                    TV program

Discographer René Aagaard lists this program, entitled “The San Francisco Sound,” as having been recorded between October 1 and 5, and as having aired on September 8, 1969. Local newspaper TV listings confirm that date, despite the fact that the Flag had broken up more than a year previously. The hour-long show also featured the Buffalo Springfield, Blue Cheer, Spanky and Our Gang, and Richie Havens along with the Gary Burton Quartet. The program was filmed in a studio with a light show produced by The Headlights in an effort to recreate the feel of the city's rock venues. It was hosted by jazz producer Jimmy Lyons and Chet Helms of the Family Dog; Gordon Waldear was the producer.


Personnel as September 7.
Crystal Ballroom, Portland, OR; October 13, 14, 1967

Performance cancelled

These shows were cancelled due to the arrests in Huntington Beach.


Personnel as September 7.
Cheetah, Santa Monica, CA; October 20-22, 1967

Unknown titles                                 Live performances


Personnel as September 7.
The Factory, Madison, WI; October 25, 1967

Unknown titles
                                Live performance

Personnel as September 7.

Holy Cross Fieldhouse, Worcester, MA; October 1967

 

Unknown titles                               Live performance

 

Personnel as September 7.

Psychedelic Supermarket, Boston, MA; November 1-12, 1967

 

I Don’t Want No Soul Around My House        “In Boston,” (Bootleg CD)

Killing Floor

Goin’ Down Slow

Messin’ with the Kid

Groovin’ Is Easy

Good to Me

Sweet Soul Music/Keep a-Knockin’/The Things I Used to Do/Fannie Mae

Drivin’ Wheel

Born Under a Bad Sign/Raise Your Hand

Sitting in Circles

Another Country

Higher and Higher

I'm Sick Ya'll

I’ve Been Lovin’ You Too Long

It Takes Time

Wine

 

Bloomfield is the vocalist on “Good to Me.” Herbie Rich may be the vocalist on "Bad Sign." Thanks to Marc Skobac for these dates.


Personnel, venue and dates as above, but add J. Geils, g; Magic Dick, hca.

Two unknown titles                    Live performance
 

*The ELECTRIC FLAG

Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Barry Goldberg(?), org, p; Harvey Brooks, b; Buddy Miles, d, v; Marcus Doubleday, tp; Herbie Rich, as; Peter Strazza, ts; Nick Gravenites, v, g, perc.

Village Theater, New York, NY; November 17, 18, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Personnel as November 17.
Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA; November 18, 1967

Unknown titles                                     Live performance

 

Personnel as November 17.

Cheetah, Venice, CA; November 20-22, 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performances

 

Personnel as November 17; omit Goldberg after November 24(?), add Michael Fonfara, org.

Bitter End, New York, NY; November 24-December 2, 1967

 

Killing Floor                          Live performances

Other unknown titles


A New York Times preview of the November 24 Bitter End performance describes it as the band’s “New York debut.” Conversely, a New York Times ad for the November 17 Village Theater performance billed the show as the Electric Flag’s “first New York appearance.” That the Flag would fly to New York, then back to California, only to return to New York two days later over a one-week period in mid-November seems unlikely, but these dates and locations are confirmed in published advertisements. The original starting date for the Bitter End appearance was given as November 22, but the Cheetah gig must have necessitated the change to November 24. Barry Goldberg had probably left the Flag by December 1967; on April 25, 1968 he appeared at the Whisky A Go Go with his new group, the Barry Goldberg Reunion; he also released an album under that name on Buddah in April. At some point during the band’s Bitter End gig, however, Goldberg was replaced by Michael Fonfara, future Rhinoceros keyboard player. Fonfara was a Canadian friend of Buddy Miles and had been performing with David Clayton Thomas at the Scene in New York in October. Herbie Rich became the group’s permanent organist after Fonfara was booted, reportedly by Albert Grossman, after being busted for drugs at the Tropicana Hotel in L.A. in mid-December. Thanks to Nick Warburton for some of this information.
A seven-minute film shot by filmmaker Ira Schneider appears to show the band's opening night at the Bitter End and, though the film is silent, one tune they play seems to be "Killing Floor."  In the film Barry Goldberg is on keyboards and an unknown trumpet player substitutes for Marcus Doubleday.

 

*PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

Butterfield, hca, v; Elvin Bishop, Michael Bloomfield, g, v; Mark Naftalin, kybds; Keith Johnson, tp; David Sanborne, as; Gene Dinwiddie, ts; Bugsy Maugh, b; Phillip Wilson, d.

Cafe Au Go-Go, New York, NY; November 1967

 

Unknown titles                                   Live performance

 

Bloomfield sat in with his old employer at the Cafe Au Go-Go one night during the Flag's stint at the Bitter End. The set was filmed and later issued in a movie entitled "Live at the Cafe Au Go-Go."

 

*The ELECTRIC FLAG

Personnel as November 24.

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA; December 7, 1967

 

Introduction                                        “Killing Floor, Vol. 1,” (Bootleg CD)

Uptight                                                                              

Texas                                                                     

Killing Floor                                                           

Sitting in Circles                                                                

Directly from My Heart                                      

Born Under a Bad Sign                                                     

Rock Me Baby                                                                    

Messin’ with the Kid

 

Bloomfield is the vocalist on "Directly."

 

Personnel as November 24.

Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA; December 8, 9, 1967

 

Introduction                                        “Killing Floor, Vol. 2,” (Bootleg CD)

I'm Sick Ya'll                                                                 

Drivin' Wheel                                                                    

It Takes Time                                                                     

Groovin’ Is Easy                                                    

Goin’ Down Slow                                                   

Another Country                                                                

Over-Lovin' You                                                     

 

This concert set is introduced as being “Saturday night at the Grand Ole Opry,” but the venue is the Winterland Ballroom. B.B. King was also on the roster for these performances.


Personnel as November 24, add John Simon, moog syn.

Los Angeles, CA; December 1967

 

Freakout                              “You Are What You Eat,” Columbia OS-3240

Movie Music – Improvisation                 “Old Glory,” Columbia CK-57629


“Freakout” was issued on the soundtrack to “You Are What You Eat,” a film by John Simon and Barry Feinstein released in 1967. The Flag did not appear in that film, and the tune sounds as if it were actually recorded in May 1967 during "The Trip" soundtrack sessions. “Movie Music,” also intended for "You Are What You Eat," was not used in that film.

 

Susan Smith and Bloomfield decide to end their marriage of four years in December of 1967. Susan goes back to Chicago but returns to California in the summer of 1968.

 

© 2013 David Dann